Elements that can have Expanded Octet

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Jason_Glass_2L
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:43 pm

Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby Jason_Glass_2L » Thu Nov 12, 2020 7:58 pm

Can only elements in the 3d have an expanded octet or is it any element in the d subshell?

Rich Luong 1D
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby Rich Luong 1D » Thu Nov 12, 2020 8:04 pm

So elements that count for the expanded octet rule are those in 3p and beyond. I'm not sure it applies to the s and d orbitals because they're usually cations in many cases, but for sure any element in the p orbitals n = 3 and beyond will count for it. I hope this helps!

705383815
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:10 pm

Re: Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby 705383815 » Thu Nov 12, 2020 8:18 pm

If you look at it while considering quantum-number theory, then the following statement might help you: elements with an "n" value that equals three or more are capable of having d-orbitals. The expanded-octet rule refers to elements sharing electrons in the d-orbital, and this includes n=elements such as sulfur and phosphorous.

Madisen Brown -1C
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby Madisen Brown -1C » Thu Nov 12, 2020 8:30 pm

Elements in row 3 or higher can have expanded octets because they can make use of the d-orbitals. Hope this helps!

kateraelDis1L
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:54 pm

Re: Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby kateraelDis1L » Thu Nov 12, 2020 10:11 pm

What does make use of the d-orbital mean in in this situation ? ^^

Marco Morales 2G
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:04 pm

Re: Elements that can have Expanded Octet

Postby Marco Morales 2G » Thu Nov 12, 2020 10:37 pm

Only elements from the 3rd period and down can have an expanded octet. Because they all have "n" states bigger than 2, which means their "l" states can be s, p, d, or f orbitals, depending on the particular element you're focusing on and what their "n" state is.


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