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Does being more polarizable= Being stronger?

Posted: Fri May 18, 2018 3:43 pm
by Mario Reyes 1C
In regards to the example of CH4 and CCl4, CCl4 has a higher boiling point. This is because it has more electrons and is more polarizable, so does this mean being more polarizable means being stronger? Also, F2 and Cl2 being gases at room temp, while Br2 is a liquid and I2 is a solid. Does this follow the same logic?

Re: Does being more polarizable= Being stronger?

Posted: Fri May 18, 2018 4:56 pm
by 204917020
High polarizability means that the electron cloud can easily be distorted or electrons are more easily pulled away from the central atom. They form bonds with greater covalent character because the electron is pulled further between the two bonding molecules. As polarizability increases, the dispersion forces become stronger, therefore molecules are attracted to each other more strongly accounting for an increase in melting and boiling point. So, you could say that higher polarizability means stronger bonds.

Re: Does being more polarizable= Being stronger?

Posted: Fri May 18, 2018 8:09 pm
by Chris Qiu 1H
High polarizability creates stronger bonds which is why ions with bigger atomic radii (higher polarizability) like Br2 and I2 are not gases