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Polarizability and States of Matter

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 5:57 pm
by Olivia Young 1A
I am a little confused as to the relationship between a molecule's polarizability and its state of matter (solid, liquid, gas). In class we discussed how molecules with high polarizability boil at a higher temperature, but I don't know why this happens. Could someone please explain?

Re: Polarizability and States of Matter

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:01 pm
by Brian Chhoy 4I
Molecules with high polarizability boil at higher temperatures because polarizability is how easy it is to move its electron cloud. Thus those with easily movable electron clouds are more likely to have more dispersion forces, which are the uneven dispersion of electron in the electron cloud, and thus have more intermolecular attractive forces to each other. Thus with more attractive forces to one another, it takes more energy to break those bonds and make it change its state of matter,

Re: Polarizability and States of Matter

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:01 pm
by Max Hayama 4K
The polarizability of electrons in a molecule will impact the electron distortion. These electron distortions create dispersion forces that will impact the intermolecular forces acting between molecules. As a result, if there are greater intermolecular forces amongst molecules, it will require more energy to break apart these bonds during a transition from liquid to gaseous states.