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Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 11:02 pm
by Trent Yamamoto 2J
Why are highly distorted electrons described as being highly polarizable? Which characteristics result in the ionic bond being more covalent in character?

Re: Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:29 pm
by RoshniVarmaDis1K
Highly distorted electrons are highly polarizable because they can be pulled away from their central atoms towards the bonding region.

Ionic bonds display covalent characteristics when electrostatic attraction pulls electrons from the anion towards the cation. The electrons being pulled towards the bonding region is a "covalent characteristic."

Re: Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:45 pm
by Victor James 4I
^^ the pulling of the electrons is sort of similar to the sharing of electrons in a covalent bond, which is why they call it covalent characteristic

Re: Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:28 pm
by Junwei Sun 4I
Highly distorted electrons are described as highly polarizable because they are more likely to cause dipoles. As electrons are pulled toward one side of the ions they are really likely to create dipole since the charge now is uneven. The more the number of distorted electrons being pulled into the bonding region between two ions, the more the ionic bond has covalent character.

Re: Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:20 pm
by Drake Choi_1I
What causes electrons to be distorted?

Re: Distorted e- as highly polarizable

Posted: Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:23 pm
by Siya Shah 1J
Electrons can be distorted when there is a nearby atom that has a higher polarizing power that pulls on the electron cloud, introducing distortion.