Can an Anion be Polarizing

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Pranav Kadiyala 1A
Posts: 121
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:58 pm

Can an Anion be Polarizing

Postby Pranav Kadiyala 1A » Mon Nov 09, 2020 12:51 pm

So in this context we typically refer to the Anion as polarizable and the Cation as polarizing. Is it possible for the Anion to be polarizing and the Cation to be polarizable? What would this mean in terms of the covalent/ionic nature of their bond?

Ria Nawathe 1C
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm
Been upvoted: 3 times

Re: Can an Anion be Polarizing

Postby Ria Nawathe 1C » Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:01 pm

I think the electrons on the anion are referred to as polarizable and the cation as polarizing and not the other way around because the protons in the nucleus of the cation don't "move" due to the attractive force they experience from the electrons of the anion. It is the electrons that are involved in bonding and pulled toward the nucleus. Hope this helps!

Wasila Sun 2I
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Can an Anion be Polarizing

Postby Wasila Sun 2I » Tue Nov 10, 2020 9:05 am

I think this is related to the charge. An cation is a positively charged ion, which means that it gives an electron to an anion. This means that the cation is polarizing because it has the ability to polarize and give it's electrons away. The anion, a negatively charged ion, is polarizable because it gains an electron aka allowing to be polarized.

Gillian Gabrielsen2F
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:03 pm
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Can an Anion be Polarizing

Postby Gillian Gabrielsen2F » Wed Nov 11, 2020 9:25 am

I don't think so. A cation's positive charge is what causes it to be polarizing. Since a cation has a positive charge, the nucleus has a greater pull on the cation's electrons and they're held more tightly within the electron cloud. An anion has a negative charge, which means it has an excess of electrons and generally has a larger atomic radius. This makes an anion's nucleus not have as great of a hold on the outermost electrons, So the Cation's positive charge is able attract the anion's electrons and pull them in closer. I don't think an anion could have a same effect on a cation since anion's have a negative charge, which would repel electrons rather than attracts them. Hope this helped

Taber Ball 1F
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: Can an Anion be Polarizing

Postby Taber Ball 1F » Wed Nov 11, 2020 11:48 am

gillian1J wrote:I don't think so. A cation's positive charge is what causes it to be polarizing. Since a cation has a positive charge, the nucleus has a greater pull on the cation's electrons and they're held more tightly within the electron cloud. An anion has a negative charge, which means it has an excess of electrons and generally has a larger atomic radius. This makes an anion's nucleus not have as great of a hold on the outermost electrons, So the Cation's positive charge is able attract the anion's electrons and pull them in closer. I don't think an anion could have a same effect on a cation since anion's have a negative charge, which would repel electrons rather than attracts them. Hope this helped


This is an awesome explanation! Thank you so much! I found a diagram which might be helpful in visualizing the way the cation pulls the electrons toward it demonstrating how the cation is polarizing and the anion is polarizable. The diagram uses the example of water where the oxygen atom is the cation and the hydrogen atoms are the anions. Hope everyone finds this helpful!
Attachments
Q918vcB1QJWEQosk7NO6_polar_-_water1334534718519.jpg


Return to “Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest