Covalent and Ionic Character

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Marisa_Woo_2G
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby Marisa_Woo_2G » Fri Oct 28, 2016 3:23 pm

HI!

I just wanted to clarify how to determine covalent and ionic character. If the compound is between a non-metal and non-metal, is the character more covalent? And if the compound is between a metal and non-metal, is the character more ionic?

Thanks so much!

Aya_Elarid_2H
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby Aya_Elarid_2H » Fri Oct 28, 2016 4:17 pm

So the bigger the difference between the electronegativity of two atoms, the more likely it is to be ionic. If the electronegativity is the same between elements, then the bond is likely covalent. To find out the actual electronegativity numbers of atoms, there are several charts online or in the textbook. Hope this helps!!

michaeljwilson3
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby michaeljwilson3 » Fri Oct 28, 2016 6:44 pm

So if ionic character depends on the difference of electronegativity between two atoms, HF would have more ionic character than say HCl? Even though there's still a fairly large difference in electronegativity in the latter?

Jennifer_Wong_1G
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby Jennifer_Wong_1G » Fri Oct 28, 2016 8:39 pm

Yes that's true because fluorine's electronegativity is greater than chlorine's.

Shannonhoang
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby Shannonhoang » Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:09 pm

Whether a bond is ionic or covalent is dependent upon the electronegativities of the two atoms connected through the bond. If the difference in electronegativity is greater than 2 than the bond is considered ionic.
If the difference is less than 1.5, then the bond is considered covalent.
If the number comes out to one that is in between the two (which we are unlikely to see on the midterm), then you cannot (from what I remember Lavelle mentioning) determine anything about the bond.
If electronegativity numbers aren't provided then you have to go off the electronegativity trend (increases as you go across a period, and decreases as you go down a group). Usually it's really clear though if you have to determine whether or not a bond is ionic or covalent based off trends alone. E.g. the elements will be on opposite sides of the periodic table so it's ionic.

Janette 3B
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Covalent and Ionic Character

Postby Janette 3B » Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:57 pm

A short way to remember ionic and covalent bonds are:

ionic bonds: usually two atom from opposite sides, an atom from the left side with an atom from the right side of the periodic table
covalent bonds: usually two atoms on the same side of the periodic table (right side)


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