Problem 4.57

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Sydney Wu 2M
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Problem 4.57

Postby Sydney Wu 2M » Tue Nov 01, 2016 8:03 am

How is oxygen more electronegative than nitrogen if it has a lower ionization energy?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Problem 4.57

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:58 am

Electronegativity is electron affinity and oxygen needs two electrons to fill an octet whereas nitrogen needs three. Nitrogen has a higher ionization energy than oxygen because it has a half filled p-orbitals and half filled orbitals are fairly stable. Remember that ionization energy is the energy of removing an electron and that electronegativity (or electron affinity) is how much an atom wants to gain electrons.

Sydney Wu 2M
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Problem 4.57

Postby Sydney Wu 2M » Thu Nov 03, 2016 5:52 pm

So, generally speaking, ionization energy and electronegativity are directly related (IE and EN increase across a period), but oxygen is an exception since it has one e- over a half-filled orbital?

Beata_Vayngortin_3L
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Re: Problem 4.57

Postby Beata_Vayngortin_3L » Fri Nov 04, 2016 9:53 am

Yes oxygen is an exception because when you compare it with Nitrogen, Nitrogen is more stable because it has a half filled shell while oxygen has 2 unpaired electrons. Oxygen would be okay with losing an electron to become half full like nitrogen is while nitrogen is very stable with its shell half way filled and does not want to lose electrons. this is why oxygen does not follow the trend for ionization energy.


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