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Isoelectronic

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:22 pm
by Kassandra Molina 2B
What does it mean for elements to be isoelectronic?

Re: Isoelectronic  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:27 pm
by Alex Kashou
Atoms and ions have the same number of electrons. For example, Na+, Mg+2, F-, and Ne are isolectronic because they have the same amount of electrons.

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:04 pm
by Michaela Capps 1l
Also means they have the same electronic structure and will have similar chemical properties

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:29 pm
by Mitch Mologne 1A
However, these elements will have varying atomic radii.

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:55 pm
by Jorge Gomez3F
When an atom and ion have the same charge. For example, O- and F (not sure if O- exists but im using it to get the point across)
isoelectronic by definition are atoms which contain the same amount of electrons

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 11:24 pm
by Catherine Yang 3G
Isoelectronic ions have the same number of electrons, even though they have different numbers of protons.

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 7:58 pm
by 304984981
it means all atoms with same number of electrons
for exmaple Na has 19 electrons but Mg has 20 electrons, so they are not isoelectronic
but Na and Mg- are isoeletronic since Mg- has 20 electrons as well

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 8:33 pm
by Surya Palavali 1D
It means they have the same number of electrons. Ions of one element may be isoelectronic with uncharged atoms of another due to the gain/loss of electrons.

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 9:06 pm
by FizaBaloch1J
Isoelectronic means that two or more elements have the same numbers of electrons or the same electronic structure.

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 10:25 pm
by Anthony Mercado 1K
In the scenario of two elements being isoelectronic, why wouldn't the element gaining or losing electrons entirely become the other element it's isoelectronic to? Ie. Why wouldn't F- just become Ne?

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 10:59 pm
by Garrett Dahn 1I
In the scenario of two elements being isoelectronic, why wouldn't the element gaining or losing electrons entirely become the other element it's isoelectronic to? Ie. Why wouldn't F- just become Ne?


The feature that distinguishes elements is their atomic number, which is just the number of protons in their nucleus. The difference, then, between Fluorine and Neon is not their number of electrons or electron orbitals: it is the number of protons in their respective nuclei. Fluorine has nine protons; Neon has ten. F-, then, doesn't become Ne because F- still has nine protons. It is thus an anion of Fluorine but still very much Fluorine because the number of protons has not changed.

Hope this is helpful!

Re: Isoelectronic

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 11:11 pm
by Yitzchak Jacobson 1F
How I interpret atoms being isoelectronic, is the same as them both having the same chemical properties, and the same number of electrons. Really hope this is helpful :)