Electronegativity

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Sydni Stewart
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Electronegativity

Postby Sydni Stewart » Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:55 am

Is there certain exceptions to finding electronegativity, like there is when finding ionization energy according to the periodic table?

Michelle Wang 4I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby Michelle Wang 4I » Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:02 am

I’m not positive, but I think that electronegativity increases down a row and decreases down a group with no exceptions. Of course, the last group (noble gases) do not have electronegativity values since they have a stable configuration.

Olivia L 4E
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Re: Electronegativity

Postby Olivia L 4E » Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:49 am

Yes, the above statement is correct regarding the electronegativity trend. The noble gases, with the exceptions of Xe and Kr that sometimes bond with fluorine and highly reactive elements, do not have electronegativity values. Those two exceptions are not of much importance though.

Angel Chen 2k
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby Angel Chen 2k » Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:28 pm

One exception that I want to mention is hydrogen. The electronegativity of H is 2.1, which is larger than B and smaller than C.

Hope this helps.

Nicklas_Wright_1A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby Nicklas_Wright_1A » Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:39 pm

There are also many metals which are exceptions such as lead.

Jasmine Chow 1F
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Re: Electronegativity

Postby Jasmine Chow 1F » Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:01 pm

Electronegativity will increase upward and to the right of the periodic table. Some exceptions include noble gases, lanthanides, and actinides.

705022748
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby 705022748 » Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:14 am

Noble gases have stable configurations, so they don't have electronegativity values.

LaurenJuul_1B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby LaurenJuul_1B » Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:25 am

fluorine is the most electronegative atom since it is in the top right corner of the periodic table. just remember that electronegativity is how badly an atom wants another electron, so those closest to a full octet will be more electronegative. In addition, the smaller the atom is (the higher up in a column) the more electronegative it is since that insinuates a stronger pull from the nucleus. one exception is noble gases who, though are on the right side of the table, do not want another electron since they have a full octet already and are stable.

Rylee Nelsen 3A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:22 am

Re: Electronegativity

Postby Rylee Nelsen 3A » Fri Nov 16, 2018 9:36 am

In the periodic table electronegativity generally follows the trend of increasing left to right. However, this trend does not include the noble gases and fluorine has the highest electronegativity instead of Ne or He.


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