Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

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Yazmin Bocanegra 3L
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Yazmin Bocanegra 3L » Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:14 pm

Does the electronegativity increase/decrease across a group or period? And why?

Justin Seok 2A
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Justin Seok 2A » Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:50 pm

Electronegativity increases across a period. Electronegativity is a measure of an element's ability to attract electrons, so those to the right of the period are able to attract electrons more easily as they need electrons to fill their valence shells and thus are the most electronegative.

Audrie Chan-3B
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Audrie Chan-3B » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:22 pm

Basically, electronegativity is the electron's pulling power. It increases up a period and across the row because the nucleus charge of the atom is increasing faster than the electron shielding, making the atom more willing to increasing their number of valence electrons.

Michelle Le 1J
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Michelle Le 1J » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:28 pm

Basically, Fluorine is the most electronegative element, so it is more electronegative going across and up the periodic table and getting closer to Fluorine.

Eunice Nguyen 4I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Eunice Nguyen 4I » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:36 pm

From left to right across a period of elements, electronegativity increases. If the valence shell of an atom is less than half full, it requires less energy to lose an electron than to gain one. Similarly, if the valence shell is more than half full, it is easier to pull an electron into the valence shell than to donate one.
From top to bottom down a group, electronegativity decreases, because atomic number increases down a group, and thus there is an increased distance between the valence electrons and nucleus, or a greater atomic radius.

Jenna Ortiguerra 4G
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Jenna Ortiguerra 4G » Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:39 pm

Electronegativity increases from left to right and as you go up the periodic table, with fluorine being the most electronegative element. Electronegativity is the ability of an atom to attract electrons. These atoms have increasing electronegativity because they are closer to filling their valence shell, thus attracting electrons more easily.

Daniel Martinez 1k
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Daniel Martinez 1k » Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:55 pm

Electronegativity is the ability of an atom to pull on other atoms. The trend that electronegativity follows is that it increases to the right and up on the periodic table.

Donavin Collins 1F
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Donavin Collins 1F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 4:46 pm

On the periodic table, as you go from left to right the electronegativity increases. And as you go from top to bottom, the electronegativity decreases.

Tahlia Mullins
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Tahlia Mullins » Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:44 pm

I like to remember that fluorine is the most electronegative, and this gives a hint as to which direction electro negativity increases/decreases.

Jesalynne 2F
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Postby Jesalynne 2F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:49 pm

Electronegativity increases up and to the right of the periodic table. It also helps to remember that fluorine is the most electronegative element so electronegativity increases in the direction of fluorine.


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