Most Electronegative Element

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Inderpal Singh 2L
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Most Electronegative Element

Postby Inderpal Singh 2L » Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:04 am

Why is Flourine considered the most electronegative element and not Helium? I know that the trend increases from bottom left to top right, so I was curious.

ALee_1J
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Re: Most Electronegative Element

Postby ALee_1J » Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:06 am

He is considered an inert gas because it has 2 electrons in the s orbital. Therefore adding electrons to its shell is not favorable while fluorine desperately wants to fill the p-orbital/is about to complete its octet.

Rachel Jiang 3H
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Re: Most Electronegative Element

Postby Rachel Jiang 3H » Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:15 am

He is a noble gas and it has a fully filled valence shell with 2 electrons. Noble gases have fully filled valence shells so they would not want to gain more electrons to form bonds.

Jordan Tatang 3L
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Re: Most Electronegative Element

Postby Jordan Tatang 3L » Thu Nov 19, 2020 12:00 pm

I agree with what the others said and I wanted to add that Helium is the element with the highest ionization energy so it does follow the trend for that.

Aayushi Jani 3A
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Re: Most Electronegative Element

Postby Aayushi Jani 3A » Thu Nov 19, 2020 4:52 pm

Helium is a noble gas, so it does not want more electrons as its valence shell is already full. Fluorine, on the other hand, is a halogen, and only needs one more electron to form an octet. Thus, it has the higher electronegativity.

JaesalSoma1E
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Re: Most Electronegative Element

Postby JaesalSoma1E » Thu Nov 19, 2020 5:02 pm

It would be fluorine. You don't consider the inert gases because those elements won't take on another electron.


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