General Explanation

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Raashi Chaudhari 3B
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General Explanation

Postby Raashi Chaudhari 3B » Fri Nov 20, 2020 8:57 am

What is the significance of an atom having high electronegativity? Does it mean it is more reactive? How does it act in reactions?

Raashi Chaudhari 3B
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Raashi Chaudhari 3B » Fri Nov 20, 2020 8:57 am

Also, how do we calculate the electronegativity differences when we do not know the values of the atom's electronegativity? Is it just a general estimation?

JaesalSoma1E
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Re: General Explanation

Postby JaesalSoma1E » Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:01 am

You can estimate the electronegativity differences based on the atom's location in the periodic table, since electronegativity increases as you move to the top right of the periodic table. High electronegativity means an atom's tendency to attract electrons, so yes this means that sometimes highly electronegative atoms are more likely to form bonds, since they want to gain electrons more than other atoms.

Faith St Amant 3D
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Faith St Amant 3D » Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:33 am

Yes, and since electronegativity is generally periodic, it's safe to assume that the farther apart two elements are on the periodic table, the bigger the difference in their electronegativity. This helps when you're trying to figure out, for example, which of a group of bonds has more covalent character or ionic character, because the farther apart the two elements are on the periodic table, the more ionic character their bond will show. Hope this helps.

Tessa House 3A
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Tessa House 3A » Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:38 am

A high electronegativity means that an atom is likely to gain electrons, which is generally true of elements on the top right of the periodic table. You can determine the difference in electronegativity by looking at where the elements fall on the periodic table. Elements on the bottom left of the periodic table have low electronegativities, so if they are paired with an element near the top right of the periodic table, they will likely form ionic bonds. This is how to determine electronegativity difference without specific values for electronegativity.

Rachel Jiang 3H
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Rachel Jiang 3H » Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:43 am

Electronegativity, which is basically calculated with ionization energy and electron affinity, measures the tendency of an atom to attract a shared pair of electrons. Therefore, it is indicative of an element's tendency to react with other elements to form bonds. High electronegativity means that the atom is likely to attract a shared a pair of electrons and form bond. Most noble gases do not have electronegativity because they already have a filled valence shell and it is unlikely for them to attract any extra pair of electrons. Hope this helps!

Olivia Smith 2E
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Olivia Smith 2E » Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:54 am

A great way I learned how to compare electronegativity with just the given table is through distance. Just look at the distance from fluorine each atom is on the periodic table. The one that is further is going to be less electronegative than the one that is closer. Works across, down and around all periods and groups! With the exception being group 18 which are the noble gases. And they have a very low electronegative because of their full valence shell.

Anna Yang 1A
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Anna Yang 1A » Sat Nov 21, 2020 10:14 am

From my understanding, electronegativity basically means the electron pulling power of an atom. If you think about trends of atomic radius on the periodic table, you can remember that as you go across a period, atoms become smaller as they pull electrons in tighter. Thus, Group 17 elements tend to have high electronegativity because they pull electrons in the tightest, having smaller atomic radii. This is also due in part to them having an almost complete shell (7/8 electrons). It is harder to take electrons away from them due to their almost completion, but it is easier for them to gain that last electron due to their high pulling power for electrons, or electronegativity. This also explains why in dipoles, the delta negative tends to be these atoms with high electronegativity: their high electron pulling power pulls electrons more towards them, thus making their side more negative.

Heidi Buri 2I
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Heidi Buri 2I » Fri Nov 27, 2020 8:22 pm

Hi! Usually, an atom that has a higher electronegativity is more reactive. This means that in a reaction, an atom with a higher electronegativity is more likely to take electrons from other atoms to complete its octet.

Nan_Guan_1L
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Re: General Explanation

Postby Nan_Guan_1L » Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:50 am

from my understanding, yes higher electronegativity generally means the element is more reactive. Take F for example, the element with the highest electronegativity, it has 7 valence electrons and only need 1 more to achieve an Octet, and thus it is very reactive.


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