Strongest CX bond, where X is a halogen

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Miya Eberlein 1J
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Strongest CX bond, where X is a halogen

Postby Miya Eberlein 1J » Sun Oct 25, 2015 10:55 pm

I'm having trouble with a problem from chapter 3 number 87. We're supposed to determine which molecule would have the strongest bond, CF4, CCL4, or CBr4. The book says CF4 would have the strongest bond because it has the shortest bond, but this is an exception to the electronegativity argument. C and F are closer together than the other two elements are to C, why would the CF4 bond be the strongest?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Strongest CX bond, where X is a halogen

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun Oct 25, 2015 10:57 pm

Think about the relative sizes. Fluorine is much smaller => shorter bond => stronger bond.

Asia Yamada 2B
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Re: Strongest CX bond, where X is a halogen

Postby Asia Yamada 2B » Wed Nov 18, 2020 12:48 am

You can approach this problem by thinking about the atomic radius of each halogen. As the distance between the nuclei of the bonded atoms decrease, then the strength of that bond increases. Out of these three halogens, fluorine has the smallest atomic radius, so the nucleus of Carbon and Fluorine are closer compared to that of Carbon and Chlorine or Carbon and Bromine. Since the nucleus of Carbon and Fluorine are the closest, CF4 has the strongest bond out of the three molecules.


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