Page 1 of 1

Non-polar molecules

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:24 pm
by RichardValdez1L
If a non-polar molecule must contain zero electric dipole moments, does that mean that dipoles can exist as long as they cancel ? Or do they always have to just not exist? And does just having one dipole moment make it polar?

Re: Non-polar molecules

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:52 pm
by Briana Lopez 4K
A molecule as a whole can be Non-polar with polar bonds as long as they cancel out mmhm. Having one dipole movement makes it polar molecule if there is nothing to cancel out with it. so
C-Cl is polar bc of EN diff
but Cl-C-Cl is nonpolar because two dipole movements cancel out

Re: Non-polar molecules

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:02 pm
by Jessica Lancisi - 1I
Can it be possible that the there are two dipole moments in opposite directions that don't cancel out? like if one of the pairs has a larger difference in electronegativity

Re: Non-polar molecules

Posted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:48 pm
by Chem_Mod
Dipole moment are vectors, so although directions may be opposite, they do not add to 0 if the two vectors do not have the same magnitude.

Re: Non-polar molecules

Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:20 pm
by KarlaArevalo2F
I believe that nonpolar molecules exist as long as the dipoles cancels out and there is not net charge towards an atom. Having at least one dipole moment not canceling out will result in a polar molecule.