induced-dipole

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Josephine Chan 1B
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

induced-dipole

Postby Josephine Chan 1B » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:31 am

Can someone please clarify what the concept of an induced dipole is? Is it different from a regular dipole? thank you

Jonas Talandis
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: induced-dipole

Postby Jonas Talandis » Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:24 am

The word dipole refers to any molecule that experiences Polar sides with the negative charge on one side and a positive charge on the other side. The word induced refers to a molecule that is not necessarily polar all the time but experiences a positive charge on one side and a negative charge on the other due to random electron density increases or Vanderwall’s forces from another dipole.

Richard Ku 4H
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:16 am

Re: induced-dipole

Postby Richard Ku 4H » Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:31 am

Induced dipoles result from randomly moving electrons in an atom forming a temporary negative charge on one side of the atom. As a result, this temporary charge will "induce" a positive charge on one side of an adjacent atom, and hence result in an instantaneous dipole.

nolansheow3G
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: induced-dipole

Postby nolansheow3G » Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:48 am

Also note that induced dipoles are more common in compounds with a larger amount of electrons. So a compound like C6H12 would be more likely to have an induced dipole than CH4.


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