Difference between dipole and london forces?

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

John_Richey_4A
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby John_Richey_4A » Fri Nov 16, 2018 6:28 pm

What is it?

monikac4k
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby monikac4k » Fri Nov 16, 2018 6:45 pm

Dipole forces occur as a result of uneven electron sharing between two bonded atoms. For example in water, the oxygen pulls the electrons closer to it than the hydrogen atoms do.
London forces occur between atoms without dipole moments. When in a proximity of one another, atoms without dipole moments will induce dipoles in one another through shifts in the electron clouds.

Krista Mercado 1B
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby Krista Mercado 1B » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:52 pm

Dipole-dipole forces occur between polar molecules when the positive end of one is attracted to the negative end of the other and vice-versa.
London forces occur between all types of molecules (polar and non-polar) and are weaker than dipole-dipole forces.

Megan Wong 4E
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby Megan Wong 4E » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:58 pm

In addition, London forces, also known as Van der Waal's forces, cause a temporary partial charge for the atoms involved and is very weak.

duenezjuleny1D
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby duenezjuleny1D » Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:36 pm

London forces (known as Vander Waals) are weaker forms of dipole dipole forces. They are usually forces with unequal amounts of electrons shared between two atoms. While London forces occur when a positively charged nucleus of an atom attracts the electron cloud of another atom.

Cameron_Greenberg_3C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Difference between dipole and london forces?

Postby Cameron_Greenberg_3C » Fri Nov 23, 2018 2:18 pm

Dipole-dipole forces are specifically between two polar molecules. The negatively charged side of one molecule will be attracted to the positive side of another. The force is strictly between two separate molecules.

London forces, like dipole-dipole forces, are between two separate molecules. But London forces can between any two molecules, not just polar ones. Dipole moments only describe the average charge of a specific molecule because electrons are constantly moving around the molecule. So, at any specific time, there is an instantaneous dipole moment that shows where the electrons are present at a precise moment. If the electrons in a certain molecule are on the same side at that specific moment, that side of the molecule will be negatively charged. If a nearby molecule is similarly positively charged at this instantaneous dipole moment, then the opposites will attract and there will be attraction for a very short period of time.


Return to “Dipole Moments”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest