Induced Dipole - Induced Dipole

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Abby De La Merced 3F
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Induced Dipole - Induced Dipole

Postby Abby De La Merced 3F » Fri Nov 30, 2018 7:48 pm

Are induced dipole - induced dipole the same as dipole - dipole? I have that term written down in my notes but I am not exactly sure what the difference between them is?

Hai-Lin Yeh 1J
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Re: Induced Dipole - Induced Dipole

Postby Hai-Lin Yeh 1J » Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:11 pm

No, induced-induced dipole is between 2 nonpolar molecules whereas dipole-dipole is between two polar molecules where the partial negative would be attracted with the partial positive charge of the other molecule. In an induced-induced dipole, since the molecule is non-polar, that means one molecule can be partially positive at one moment and partially negative at another so that would cause the other molecule to also be induced (it will be partially negative since the other is positive)

Jovian Cheung 1K
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Re: Induced Dipole - Induced Dipole

Postby Jovian Cheung 1K » Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:26 pm

Induced dipole-induced dipole is the same as London / dispersion forces :-)

Sameen Mahmood 3D
Posts: 37
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:00 am

Re: Induced Dipole - Induced Dipole

Postby Sameen Mahmood 3D » Fri Nov 30, 2018 9:56 pm

Additionally, for induced dipole-induced dipole, the induced dipoles actually form because of the random arrangement of electrons in a nonpolar molecule. Just by chance, it's possible that one region of the molecule has a partial charge, causing nearby molecules to have their electron clouds distorted.


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