HW Question 3F1

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A Raab 1K
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

HW Question 3F1

Postby A Raab 1K » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:05 pm

Why does (part d) SO2 have a dipole-dipole interaction?

asannajust_1J
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Re: HW Question 3F1

Postby asannajust_1J » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:13 pm

The polarity of so2 is due to the lone pairs on the S, which creat a bent shape. This will make more sense once we learn shape.

Julie Park 1G
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Re: HW Question 3F1

Postby Julie Park 1G » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:14 pm

If you look at the lewis structure of SO2, you'll be able to see that while there are two sets of double bonds between S and O, there is still a lone pair of e- on S. This creates two dipole moments between S and each O where the S atom is a partial positive and O is partially negative.

JOtomo1F
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Re: HW Question 3F1

Postby JOtomo1F » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:13 pm

Also if you look at the trend of electronegativity, oxygen is more electronegative than S which could partially explain why the oxygen atoms have a slightly more negative charge.

Jared Khoo 1G
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Re: HW Question 3F1

Postby Jared Khoo 1G » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:01 pm

SO2 is polar, hence the dipole-dipole interactions.

Charysa Santos 4G
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Re: HW Question 3F1

Postby Charysa Santos 4G » Wed Nov 13, 2019 8:38 pm

Because there is an uneven charge distribution (of electrons) between S and O (oxygen is more electronegative), there are dipole moments that form between them, creating dipole interactions.


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