Hydrogen bonding

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kevinchang_4I
Posts: 55
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 12:17 am

Hydrogen bonding

Postby kevinchang_4I » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:40 pm

How do we know how many hydrogen bonding sites there are? Like for example on a G-C pair how many hydrogen bonding sites are there and how do we know

Vivianvelazquez_1J
Posts: 109
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am
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Re: Hydrogen bonding

Postby Vivianvelazquez_1J » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:45 pm

Hydrogen bonding is when an H atom bonds with an N,O, or F. In the G-C pair there are three hydrogen bonding sites, 2 H-O and one H-N.

005162902
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen bonding

Postby 005162902 » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:47 pm

Hydrogen bonding sites are represented by and H paired to an N, O or F so it would look something like this O-H N-H F-H. These bonds would in turn bond to an O, N or F with a lone pair on the opposite antiparallel strand of DNA. The partial positive created on the H in the N,O or F-H bond will be attracted to the partial negative charge on the O,N and F with lone pairs, attracting them to each other and creating a Hydrogen bond. A GC pair has 3 Hydrogen bonds while AT pair only has 2 H bonds. This gives GC a higher boiling point because it contains more bonds, which requires more energy to break and in turn would require more heat energy to boil and break those bonds.

zfinn
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen bonding

Postby zfinn » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:53 pm

hydrogen bonding sites are wherever an H can bond with a F,O, or N

Kyla Grunden 1L
Posts: 46
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen bonding

Postby Kyla Grunden 1L » Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:42 pm

Potential hydrogen bonding sites of a molecule include the Hydrogens on the molecule as well as the lone pairs on hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and fluorine molecules. For example, water has hydrogen bonding sites on the two hydrogen molecules and the two lone pairs on the oxygen, so it has four hydrogen bonding sites.

sbeall_1C
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Re: Hydrogen bonding

Postby sbeall_1C » Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:26 pm

Do they F, O, and N atoms on a separate molecule have to be bonded directly to a H atom for Hydrogen bonding to be able to occur? For example, in benzoic acid C6H5COOH, there is an O doubled bonded to a C, so the O is not directly bonded to an H. Can this particular O still participate in Hydrogen bonding with an H from a different molecule, even though this O is not directly bonded to an H?


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