Hydrogen Bonding Sites

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Jorja De Jesus 2C
Posts: 121
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Jorja De Jesus 2C » Wed Nov 27, 2019 9:22 am

What exactly are hydrogen bonding sites? Are they where hydrogen is just bonded to some element or where hydrogen can potentially bond with an element?

Vanessa Chuang 4F
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Vanessa Chuang 4F » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:59 am

Hydrogen bonding sites are any place where hydrogen can potentially bond with an element. This includes both the actual hydrogen atom as well as the lone pairs on the F, O, and N atoms.

Vicki Liu 2L
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Vicki Liu 2L » Wed Nov 27, 2019 11:26 am

As mentioned, hydrogen bonding sites are places on molecules where a hydrogen bond could be formed. So this could mean one of two things: a N, O, F atom with an available lone pair OR a H atom attached to a N, O, F atom. In the first instance, the lone pair could allow bonding with a nearby hydrogen atom from a different molecule. In the second instance, the H atom could bond with a nearby N, O, or F atom from a different molecule.

Justin Sarquiz 2F
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Justin Sarquiz 2F » Wed Nov 27, 2019 11:35 am

In its simplicity, each lone pair around a N, O, or F each count as one hydrogen bonding site. A hydrogen bonded to a N, O, or F also counts as a hydrogen bonding site.

alexfwang3g
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby alexfwang3g » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:16 pm

Anywhere where F, O, or N can bond with one another through a Hydrogen atom.

lauraxie2e
Posts: 108
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby lauraxie2e » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:22 pm

it is anywhere where hydrogen can potentially bond to an element, so anywhere where there is F,O,N

805394719
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby 805394719 » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:26 pm

Hydrogen bonding sites are where hydrogen bonding can occur. This includes hydrogen atoms that are bound to electronegative atoms like F, N, or O. A hydrogen bound to one of these elements would be a potential site for hydrogen bonding as well as the nitrogen, fluorine, and oxygen atoms bound to hydrogen atoms. So in a compound like HF, both the hydrogen and the fluorine would be potential hydrogen bonding sites, and in a molecule of water, oxygen and hydrogens would both be hydrogen bonding sites due to their partial charges that result from the difference in electronegativities of the atoms.

AngieGarcia_4F
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby AngieGarcia_4F » Wed Nov 27, 2019 1:13 pm

Any site where a Hydrogen atom bonds to a Nitrogen, Oxygen, or Fluorine atom.

Chetas Holagunda 3H
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am
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Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Chetas Holagunda 3H » Fri Nov 29, 2019 4:14 pm

Hydrogen bonding occurs when there is a covalent bond between a H and F, O, or N, causing a large dipole moment. Then another Hydrogen can bond on the lone pairs of the F, O, or N or another F, O, N can bond to the partially positively charged H.

Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

Postby Kaitlynn Tran 3F » Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:07 pm

It is anywhere that has potential to form a hydrogen bond. Essentially, it is any lone pair on an N, O, or F atom.


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