London Interactions

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Rose_Malki_3G
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

London Interactions

Postby Rose_Malki_3G » Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:58 pm

In Wednesday's lecture, Dr. Lavelle said that London interactions are always present and attractive. What did he mean by present? Like are London dispersion forces also present in compounds with ionic or hydrogen bonds?

EmilyC_3D
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:04 pm
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Re: London Interactions

Postby EmilyC_3D » Thu Nov 12, 2020 6:05 pm

I believe that London dispersion forces generally act as intermolecular forces between any molecules that are close to each other, regardless of type. All molecules have electrons which may be pulled/distorted slightly by London dispersion forces. For any intermolecular interaction I believe, LDF will always be happening in the background. Non-polar molecules, however, will only exhibit London dispersion forces.

Lilly Catarozoli 1B
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:53 pm

Re: London Interactions

Postby Lilly Catarozoli 1B » Thu Nov 12, 2020 6:38 pm

From what I understand, yes, London dispersion forces are always present regardless of bond type.

Sharon Kim 2A
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:42 pm

Re: London Interactions

Postby Sharon Kim 2A » Thu Nov 12, 2020 7:07 pm

Technically, London Dispersion forces are always present. It is a matter of what forces are dominating in those interactions. Such as London Dispersion forces being present in ionic bonds but the ionic forces are more dominant.

Madeline Louie 1I
Posts: 56
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm

Re: London Interactions

Postby Madeline Louie 1I » Thu Nov 12, 2020 7:28 pm

Induced dipole-induced dipole interactions are always present when molecules are interacting. This is because all compounds have electrons and the electrons will fluctuate to create attractive interactions.

Emma Ide 2E
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: London Interactions

Postby Emma Ide 2E » Fri Nov 13, 2020 1:28 pm

London interactions are always present because electrons are always fluctuating, even in a neutrally charged molecule, there will still be a little bit of electron repulsion when two molecules are near each other.


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