Sapling #13

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IreneSeo3F
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Sapling #13

Postby IreneSeo3F » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:39 pm

Hi! I'm having difficulty with problem 13 in sapling assignment.
The problem asks:
what is the maximum theoretical number of water molecules that one urea molecule can hydrogen bond with?
How can I solve this?

Bronson Mathos 1H
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:36 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Bronson Mathos 1H » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:55 pm

I solved this using the N, O, and F rule of hydrogen bonding by locating and counting all the possible points on the structure where a hydrogen bond could occur and that total should give you your answer as the question implies that the water molecules would bond to urea using hydrogen bonds.

Leo Naylor 2F
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:42 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Leo Naylor 2F » Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:59 pm

Also, each lone pair on an atom like nitrogen can form a hydrogen bond, as long as you ignore that the space might not be enough for two water molecules. Thus, the answer might be more than you originally thought. Hope this helps!

Kimiya Aframian IB
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:01 pm

IreneSeo3F wrote:Hi! I'm having difficulty with problem 13 in sapling assignment.
The problem asks:
what is the maximum theoretical number of water molecules that one urea molecule can hydrogen bond with?
How can I solve this?

Hi! For this problem you need to consider the circumstances that allow for hydrogen bonding. Those circumstances are an H atom bonded to another highly electronegative atom. Another location would be where there is an N, O, or F that has a lone pair of an electrons. Hope this helps!

Jessica Hu 3L
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:46 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Jessica Hu 3L » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:07 pm

Adding onto this, I ended up figuring this out, but I'm still confused about the exact number, I counted the atoms most likely to form a Hydrogen bond but that number was less than the number I ended up getting.

Rachel Kho Disc 2G
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:46 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Rachel Kho Disc 2G » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:07 pm

Make sure you count the hydrogen bonds that are already in the urea molecule, because that's where I made a mistake. Initially, I only counted the hydrogen bonds that COULD form and so it took me a few tries to get to the right answer.

David Liu 1E
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:07 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby David Liu 1E » Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:23 pm

you locate the amount of N,O,and F atoms that a hydrogen bond can form, and then you check how many lone pairs each one of these have for a hydrogen bond to form with!

Lillian
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Lillian » Mon Nov 16, 2020 12:02 am

Jessica Hu 3L wrote:Adding onto this, I ended up figuring this out, but I'm still confused about the exact number, I counted the atoms most likely to form a Hydrogen bond but that number was less than the number I ended up getting.

The exact amount is 8 I'm pretty sure. For each hydrogen atoms, the oxygen in a water molecule will bond (which makes 4). For each lone pair of electrons on one of the electronegative atoms, the hydrogen in a water molecule will bond (another 4). This adds up to 8. Hope this helps! :)

Jessica Hu 3L
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:46 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Jessica Hu 3L » Tue Nov 17, 2020 2:46 pm

Lillian wrote:
Jessica Hu 3L wrote:Adding onto this, I ended up figuring this out, but I'm still confused about the exact number, I counted the atoms most likely to form a Hydrogen bond but that number was less than the number I ended up getting.

The exact amount is 8 I'm pretty sure. For each hydrogen atoms, the oxygen in a water molecule will bond (which makes 4). For each lone pair of electrons on one of the electronegative atoms, the hydrogen in a water molecule will bond (another 4). This adds up to 8. Hope this helps! :)


Oh that makes a lot of sense thanks!

Lillian
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm

Re: Sapling #13

Postby Lillian » Sun Nov 29, 2020 5:09 pm

Jessica Hu 3L wrote:
Lillian wrote:
Jessica Hu 3L wrote:Adding onto this, I ended up figuring this out, but I'm still confused about the exact number, I counted the atoms most likely to form a Hydrogen bond but that number was less than the number I ended up getting.

The exact amount is 8 I'm pretty sure. For each hydrogen atoms, the oxygen in a water molecule will bond (which makes 4). For each lone pair of electrons on one of the electronegative atoms, the hydrogen in a water molecule will bond (another 4). This adds up to 8. Hope this helps! :)


Oh that makes a lot of sense thanks!


Yey! Glad it helped :))


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