Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interaction and Boiling Point

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Eliana Carney 3E
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interaction and Boiling Point

Postby Eliana Carney 3E » Mon Nov 16, 2020 10:20 pm

Hey guys! I don't understand how exactly the strength of an induced dipole-induced dipole interaction and boiling point relate to each other. If you could explain how these two correlate and how you would go about figuring out the boiling point of a substance (or rather figuring out if it has a high or low boiling point), that would be great. Thanks in advance!

Claire_Latendresse_1E
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Re: Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interaction and Boiling Point

Postby Claire_Latendresse_1E » Mon Nov 16, 2020 10:44 pm

Hi! As bond strength increases, the boiling point will also increase because if the bonds are stronger, it will take more energy to sever them. In terms of covalent bonding, hydrogen bonds would be linked to the highest boiling points because they are stronger bonds.
For a molecule with induced dipole-induced dipole interactions (I.D-I.D), the stronger the interaction is, the higher the boiling point will be. Dr. Lavelle gave an example of I.D-I.D strength in terms of surface area in one of the lectures last week. A molecule with a greater surface area has chances of forming multiple shorter bonds than a molecule of the same chemical formula with a smaller surface area. The molecule with a greater surface area will have a greater boiling point because of the strength of its I.D-I.D. interactions.
I don't think there's a way to find a precise number for a boiling point without more information given, but you can figure out a qualitative boiling point (higher or lower) based on interaction strengths.
I hope this helps!

Jaclyn Dang 3B
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interaction and Boiling Point

Postby Jaclyn Dang 3B » Mon Nov 16, 2020 10:46 pm

In short, when the bond interaction strength increases, so does the boiling point. In addition if the amount of bond interactions is high, such as van der waals with a rod shaped molecule instead of a spherical one, the boiling point will be higher as well


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