VSEPR Model for Water

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Dhwani Krishnan 1G
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

VSEPR Model for Water

Postby Dhwani Krishnan 1G » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:32 pm

Why isn't H2O a linear molecule, but CO2 (for example) is? How do we know the bond angle isn't 180?

almaochoa2D
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: VSEPR Model for Water

Postby almaochoa2D » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:38 pm

Because CO2 has double bonds and H2O doesn't.

Faith Fredlund 1H
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: VSEPR Model for Water

Postby Faith Fredlund 1H » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:44 pm

When you draw the Lewis structures of H2O and CO2 you should see that the O in the H20 has two lone pairs of electrons, which somewhat clump together due to the repulsion of the H atoms. These electrons, in effect, cause the bent shape of the atoms. Meanwhile, the Lewis structure of CO2 shows the C double bonded to each of the Oxygens. Because the electrons are shared evenly and there are no lone pairs, the geometry is linear.

Andrew Lam 3B
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: VSEPR Model for Water

Postby Andrew Lam 3B » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:45 pm

The oxygen molecule on water has 2 lone pairs that cause the bond angle to be slightly depressed to around 109.5; this is called a bent configuration.


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