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Lone pairs

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 8:50 pm
by Rebecca Epner 4A
Why are lone pairs more likely to be found in certain locations around a central atom? And which locations are these?

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:03 pm
by Kimberly Koo 2I
Lone pairs occupy more space around the central atom than bonding pairs and lone pairs are also more impacted by electrostatic repulsion between like charges

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:45 pm
by Aarja Pavade 1H
The lone pairs can either be axial or equatorial. The axial lone pairs lie on the axis of the molecule and the equatorial lone pairs lie on the equator of the molecule, the plane perpendicular to the axis.

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:47 pm
by Anish Patel 4B
How do you determine whether electrons are axial or equatorial?

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:53 pm
by KnarGeghamyan1B
You determine whether a lone pair is axial or equatorial by looking at the bond angles and making sure the lone pair has enough room to evenly repel the other bonded electrons.

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:17 pm
by Martina
Lone pairs are usually located in a place where they form fewer bond angles with other atoms. So in the See Saw shape they are located on the equatorial plane where they only interact with 2 bonds.

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:22 pm
by Nathan Rothschild_2D
If a lone pair is a radical would it have a weaker repulsion than a complete lone pair?

Re: Lone pairs

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 1:23 am
by Vuong_2F
Nathan Rothschild_3D wrote:If a lone pair is a radical would it have a weaker repulsion than a complete lone pair?


I'm assuming so because a radical would occupy less space than a complete lone pair. Please correct me if I'm wrong though!