Melting Point

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Jordi M 2I
Posts: 149
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Melting Point

Postby Jordi M 2I » Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:13 pm

The molecule C2H5OC2H5 (diethyl ether) has a slightly higher melting point than C4H9OH. Since both molecules have the same number of atoms, the reason must be behind the shape of diethyl ether but I am not sure exactly why. Can someone explain?

Marc Lubman 3B
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm
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Re: Melting Point

Postby Marc Lubman 3B » Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:28 pm

Hi Jordi, by C4H9OH do you mean 1-butanol? Because the molecule with the lewis structure you're describing, a straight chain with an OH at the end, actually has a higher melting point than diethyl ether does (at least according to google), which makes sense because diethyl ether is a nonpolar chain molecule whereas 1-butanol is a polar chain, and the polarity leads to dipole-dipole interactions that hold the 1-butanol molecules closer together and raise their melting point.
Last edited by Marc Lubman 3B on Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Pranav Daggubati 3C
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: Melting Point

Postby Pranav Daggubati 3C » Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:28 pm

I think you are mistaken, as butanol (1-butanol), has a much higher melting point than diethyl ether by about 27 degrees Celsius. This is due to the polarity of the butanol molecule which comes from the -OH group.

Jordi M 2I
Posts: 149
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Re: Melting Point

Postby Jordi M 2I » Wed Nov 11, 2020 2:32 pm

Oh okay, yeah I think I messed up. Thank you, that makes sense.


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