Magnetic Quantum Number

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Stef Newell
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby Stef Newell » Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:35 pm

What values can the Magnetic Quantum Number (ml) take on?

Alex Leve 3F
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby Alex Leve 3F » Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:17 pm

The magnetic quantum number can range from -l to +l. One thing to note, however, is that only integer values are allowed for the magnetic quantum number. For instance, if l=2, the magnetic quantum number could be -2, -1, 0, 1, or 2.

804899546
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby 804899546 » Sat Nov 04, 2017 9:22 pm

Is there any way for us to tell exactly what magnetic quantum number an electron would have within an orbital without doing an experiment? Will we ever be asked which magnetic quantum number an electron has?

Kevin Ru 1D
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby Kevin Ru 1D » Sat Nov 04, 2017 11:48 pm

Hi, I don't believe there is a way for us to determine the magnetic quantum number (ml) a specific electron has without doing an experiment. Thus, we will most likely not be asked about a specific ml number. Rather it is more likely that we will be asked about the range such as on the previous quiz. Hope this helps!

Shreya Ramineni 2L
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby Shreya Ramineni 2L » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:55 pm

The range for ml is -l to l, so its dependent on the subshell (l) of the element.

JonathanLam1G
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby JonathanLam1G » Mon Nov 06, 2017 5:21 pm

804899546 wrote:Is there any way for us to tell exactly what magnetic quantum number an electron would have within an orbital without doing an experiment? Will we ever be asked which magnetic quantum number an electron has?


By convention, the first half of any orbital (d1 - d5) has +1/2 spins while the latter half (d6 - d10) has -1/2 spins.
Also, notice how there are 5 elements in the first half of a d orbital and 5 elements in the latter half - 10 elements in each d orbital in total. This corresponds to magnetic quantum numbers -2 for the first element, -1 for the second element, 0 for the third element, 1 for the fourth element and 2 for the fifth element of each half.

Allyson Charco Dis1G
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Magnetic Quantum Number

Postby Allyson Charco Dis1G » Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:21 am

The Principal quantum n would usually be given to you for you to solve. To find l you subtract n-1 which could take on the values 0,1,2,3,4..... and remember that l is also the subshell in which 0=s, 1=p, 2=d, 3=f. The value of m sub l is what ever l is such as l=2 m sub l equal both the negative and positive integer of that number and all those numbers between it such as l=2 m sub l = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2 and m sub s is also equal to plus or minus one half.


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