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Xenon Tetrafluoride?

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:29 pm
by Daniel Rivas 3L
So today in class Dr. Lavelle showed us the shape of a Xenon Tetrafluoride molecule. But how does this molecule exist? From what I understand, molecules with the noble gases can only be made in a lab so it isn't natural right? And I also think it doesn't last very long. Should I memorize what it is?

Re: Xenon Tetrafluoride?

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:39 pm
by Lucian1F
This molecule, and all molecules with a square planar shape are rather rare. You don't need to know the element as long as you know how to draw the lewis structure. Once you have the lewis structure down, you can see the regions of electron density and see if they are lone pairs or bonds, then this will allow you to determine the shape. You do, however, need to memorize all the names of the geometric shapes of molecules

Re: Xenon Tetrafluoride?

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:59 pm
by Michelle Nguyen 2L
Usually noble gases would not form any bonds but since xenon is such a heavy noble gas with valence electrons so far away from the nucleus and experiencing very little attraction that it can be forced to make bonds with very electronegative elements such as fluorine. As stated above, you probably don't have to memorize that it exists, just know how to draw lewis structures for it and compounds similar to it; basically, knowing xenon tetrafluoride specifically isn't important- we are just expected to know how to draw lewis structures.

Re: Xenon Tetrafluoride?

Posted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:08 pm
by Janet Nguyen 2H
Michelle Nguyen 1B wrote:Usually noble gases would not form any bonds but since xenon is such a heavy noble gas with valence electrons so far away from the nucleus and experiencing very little attraction that it can be forced to make bonds with very electronegative elements such as fluorine. As stated above, you probably don't have to memorize that it exists, just know how to draw lewis structures for it and compounds similar to it; basically, knowing xenon tetrafluoride specifically isn't important- we are just expected to know how to draw lewis structures.

I approve this answer. You don't specifically need to know xenon tetrafluoride; just know how to draw Lewis structures generally!

Re: Xenon Tetrafluoride?

Posted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:31 pm
by Sohini Halder 1G
Hi! This confused me at first too, as noble gases do not usually form compounds. However, Dr. Lavelle states that because Xenon is an element with multiple shells and valence electrons that are quite shielded from the nucleus's pulling power, they can be shared. You might notice that we have only seen molecules where Xenon interacts with Fluorine and Oxygen. I believe that because of the high electronegativity of these two elements, their interaction with Xenon causes covalent molecules to form despite the inert gas characteristics of Xe.