Radicals and Their Shape

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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MCracchiolo 1C
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Radicals and Their Shape

Postby MCracchiolo 1C » Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:45 pm

When using VSEPR and Lewis structures to describe radicals, is a lone electron treated as its own region of electron density? How does a lone electron affect the shape?

Mirrat
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Re: Radicals and Their Shape

Postby Mirrat » Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:04 pm

Lone pairs take up more space on the molecule than bonding pair electrons because they face a lot of repulsion from neighbouring lone pairs and bonding pairs so they usually cause the molecule to have a bent/angular shape.

Mike Vinci 2B
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Re: Radicals and Their Shape

Postby Mike Vinci 2B » Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:28 pm

Using the VSEPR theory we've been learning in class, we are able to predict the structure of atoms surrounding the central atom. In order to find the structure, we must first determine the structure by identifying regions of electron density. A region of electron density can either be bonding or non-bonding, and for your question regarding non-bonding regions, the number of lone pairs on the central atom are the number of regions of non-bonding electron densities. Due to their repulsive characteristics, lone pairs help repel the positive attraction of atoms surrounding the central atom, and therefore we see different shapes and structures form as a result of stronger repulsive forces from varying amounts of lone pairs.

Priyanka Bhakta 1L
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Re: Radicals and Their Shape

Postby Priyanka Bhakta 1L » Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:35 pm

Hi! So to answer your question about lone, unpaired electrons on radicals: I believe that Lavelle might have said this quickly or in passing, but it is my understanding that unpaired electrons on radicals are considered a region of electron density. Although, because there is only 1 electron and not 2 in a pair, the repulsions the unpaired electron creates is weaker and thus, the angles it creates with nearby bonded atoms are smaller.

Radha Patel 1D
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Re: Radicals and Their Shape

Postby Radha Patel 1D » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:50 am

If a lone pair is still considered a region of electron density how would we calculate the formal charge of the atom with half of a lone pair?


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