Question 4.1 Part B

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Iris Shim 1E
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Question 4.1 Part B

Postby Iris Shim 1E » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:55 pm

For question 4.1 part b, how come the second model may have lone pairs on the central atom? If there was a lone pairs on the central atom, wouldn't the bonding pairs move away from the lone pair making the angle less than 180 degrees?

Jonathan Tangonan 1E
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Question 4.1 Part B

Postby Jonathan Tangonan 1E » Sun Nov 26, 2017 10:10 pm

There are multiple electron geometries that can produce a linear shape depending on the number of lone pairs a centra atom has. For instance, in the case of a molecule whose central atom has 5 regions of high electron density and and 3 lone pairs it will produce a linear shape. This is the same for a molecule whose central atom has 6 regions of high electron density and 4 lone pairs would also produce a linear shape. In some of these cases, the way the lone pairs maximize the distance between atoms surrounding a central atom is by keeping them at 180 degrees and what also has to be taken into consideration is that the lone pairs need to be separated to a certain extent and the shapes that are produced are what would be considered to have the maximized distance.


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