Lone pairs on non-central atoms

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Jonghwee Park 1K
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Lone pairs on non-central atoms

Postby Jonghwee Park 1K » Sun May 27, 2018 9:17 pm

Do lone pairs on non-central atoms affect the bond length or bond angle?

NatalieSDis1A
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Lone pairs on non-central atoms

Postby NatalieSDis1A » Sun May 27, 2018 9:18 pm

They affect the bond angle because they take up more space and generate stronger repulsion than a regular bond.

Alexis Bravo 1D
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Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Lone pairs on non-central atoms

Postby Alexis Bravo 1D » Sun May 27, 2018 9:38 pm

lone pairs on non-central atoms affect the bond angle

Adam Yaptangco 1D
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Re: Lone pairs on non-central atoms

Postby Adam Yaptangco 1D » Tue May 29, 2018 5:33 pm

The negative charge of the lone pair electrons result in the repulsion of other electrons in the molecule. The repulsion creates the different bond angles.

Ignacio Ramirez 1J
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:02 am

Re: Lone pairs on non-central atoms

Postby Ignacio Ramirez 1J » Tue May 29, 2018 5:42 pm

As soon as a lone pair exists on a central atom, there is a tendency to have the lone pair occupy an orbital with an s-contribution as high as possible and to have bonding orbitals with a maximized p-contribution. p-orbitals, having a direction, can form stronger σ bonds due to better overlap. This is why the bond angle drops quickly when comparing second-period to third-period central elements to close to 90∘. Lone pairs on non-central atoms result in the repulsion of electrons creating different bond angles.


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