Bond angles and lone pairs

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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alexagreco1A
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Bond angles and lone pairs

Postby alexagreco1A » Mon May 28, 2018 5:54 pm

How can we determine whether or not there must be lone pairs from the bond angle?

Solene Poulhazan
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Bond angles and lone pairs

Postby Solene Poulhazan » Mon May 28, 2018 7:35 pm

The less there are of bonding groups, the more lone pairs are present.

Hannah Lee 1B
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Bond angles and lone pairs

Postby Hannah Lee 1B » Tue May 29, 2018 4:37 pm

If the bond angle is smaller than usual, then there are more lone pairs. For example, a bent shape with AX2E2 (H2O) has a bond angle of <109.5 while a bent shape with AX2E (O3) has a bond angle of <120.

Alexandra Wade 1L
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Bond angles and lone pairs

Postby Alexandra Wade 1L » Wed May 30, 2018 11:24 am

Lone pairs repel the bonding angles because the repulsion strength between a lone pair and a bonding pair is greater than two bonding pairs. Therefore with the addition of more lone pairs forces the bonding electrons closer together.

Salena Chowdri 1I
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am

Re: Bond angles and lone pairs

Postby Salena Chowdri 1I » Wed May 30, 2018 4:02 pm

if you are given just the bond angle and number of atoms involved, you'll know a lone pair is involved when the bond angle is smaller than usual. this is because lone pairs repel the bonded pairs, causing the angle to be smaller.


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