Pi bonds

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Jose Lupian 1C
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Pi bonds

Postby Jose Lupian 1C » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:46 pm

I know that pi bonds don't allow atoms to rotate but I didn't understand the reason why. Could someone please explain?

JulietOttenberg-1C
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Pi bonds

Postby JulietOttenberg-1C » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:48 pm

Because pi bonds consist of electron density on either side of the internuclear axis, the atoms cant really move out of that configuration or else the bonds wouldn't be there. It's basically just because pi bonds have two areas of electron density rather than one area.

Molly Oakes 1A
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Pi bonds

Postby Molly Oakes 1A » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:52 pm

Pi bonds come from the overlap of parallel p orbitals on adjacent atoms. Rotation would break the side-by-side positioning.

Isobel Tweedt 1E
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Pi bonds

Postby Isobel Tweedt 1E » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:12 pm

When determining pi bonds in double and triple bonds does it matter which bond is "selected" as the pi and sigma bonds?

Zuri Smith 1A
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Pi bonds

Postby Zuri Smith 1A » Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:15 pm

From what I understood in lecture, if there is a single bond, it will always be a sigma bond. A double bond will be one sigma bond and one pi bond. A triple bond will be one sigma bond and two pi bonds.

However, I do not know which of the bonds are which. Could someone explain further?


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