Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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805132275
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby 805132275 » Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:47 pm

Just to confirm, the reason why bond angles vary is based on the electron-electron repulsion due the presence of lone pairs on each distinct structure, correct?

Iris Bai 2K
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby Iris Bai 2K » Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:01 am

yes. depending on how many lone pairs there are, the bond angles will change.

josephperez_2C
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Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby josephperez_2C » Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:45 am

Lone pairs at the central atom repel shared pairs of electrons and make bond angles varied

Katelyn Phan 2A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby Katelyn Phan 2A » Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:35 am

The bond angles will change according to the presence of electrons. This is due to the concept of electron repulsion (negatives repel negatives).

Saman Andalib 1H
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Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby Saman Andalib 1H » Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:44 am

Whenever there is a lone pair present on the central atom of a molecule, the bond angles will always be reduced due to the repulsion which is now experienced as a result of the lone pair.

Destiny Diaz 4D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby Destiny Diaz 4D » Tue Nov 13, 2018 10:00 pm

can you explain this in terms of the homework problem 4.1, I am still somewhat confused as to why the bond must have lone pairs.

Manya Bali 4E
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Chapter 4 Homework Number 1

Postby Manya Bali 4E » Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:26 pm

In 4.1 (6th edition) part a, the drawing depicts a central atom with 2 other atoms bonded to it. If there were no lone pairs of electrons, then the only regions of electron density would be those associated with the 2 bonding atoms. To be the most stable structure and reduce electron repulsion, we must maximize the distance between these bonding electrons. This would occur if the two atoms would be on opposite sides of the central atom in a linear shape (180 degrees), but this is not what is shown. The atoms are closer to each other (120 degrees) which means a stronger force of electron repulsion must be acting on this structure (which are lone pairs.)


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