Linear Shape

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Netpheel Wang 4L
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Linear Shape

Postby Netpheel Wang 4L » Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:57 pm

Is it possible to have linear shape and also have lone pair electrons on the central atom?

Rosha Mamita 2H
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Linear Shape

Postby Rosha Mamita 2H » Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:59 pm

Yes, though the shape will be different and would not be called linear

Jim Brown 14B Lec1
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Linear Shape

Postby Jim Brown 14B Lec1 » Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:00 pm

Yes, a trigonal bipyramidal electron geometry with 3 lone pairs will give you a linear shape with 180º angles

Rosha Mamita 2H
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Linear Shape

Postby Rosha Mamita 2H » Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:01 pm

This structure is called bent and the lone pair on the central atom repels the electrons away from the central atom, I'm not sure if we will go over this in class but we learned about this structure in high school and AP chemistry

Jim Brown 14B Lec1
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Linear Shape

Postby Jim Brown 14B Lec1 » Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:01 pm

Rosha Mamita 1E wrote:Yes, though the shape will be different and would not be called linear

This is true for most electron geometries and will result in a bent shape, but you can still get a linear shape when there are 5 areas of electron density and 3 of them are lone pairs

Brian Chhoy 4I
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Linear Shape

Postby Brian Chhoy 4I » Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:02 pm

Yes, for example for if a central atom with 5 regions of electron density has 3 lone pairs, it will have a linear shape. The same can be said for a central atom with 6 regions of electron density that has 4 lone pairs.


Return to “Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests