Lone Pair?

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Daniel Chang 3I
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Lone Pair?

Postby Daniel Chang 3I » Sun Nov 18, 2018 6:55 pm

When there is a lone pair, the bond angle is considered to be less. But is there a way to find out how much the bond angle is affected by each lone pair?

Ronak Singh
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Lone Pair?

Postby Ronak Singh » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:05 pm

It is usually determined through experimental data.

Cody Do 2F
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Lone Pair?

Postby Cody Do 2F » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:06 pm

I'm sure there's a way to investigate the exact effect that a lone pair has on each bond angle (either through mathematical calculations or experimental observation), but I think that's well beyond the scope of this class. Lavelle said multiple times in class that, as long we understand that there is an effect on bond angles due to lone pair repulsions, we're fine. In any question that asks for bond angles, it's acceptable to put "The expected bond angle would be less than X degrees because of the lone pair, which is pushing the atoms closer together".

Sydney Tay 2B
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: Lone Pair?

Postby Sydney Tay 2B » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:07 pm

A lone pair has greater repulsion than bonded electrons and will cause the bond angles between the other atoms to decrease due to this repulsion. There is not a way to know how much a lone pair will decrease a bond angle, but as long as we know that a lone pair results in a bond angle that is lower than what it was before it should be fine. We will not be asked to state a specific number for a bond angle that has been altered by a lone pair.

305127455
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Lone Pair?

Postby 305127455 » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:56 pm

It will require tons of calculation and some mathematic models to determine the exact angles. Also, electrons are not "solid" there since they are actually cloud. This perhaps makes stuff even more difficult.


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