Polar molecules

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Michelle Nwufo 2G
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:00 am

Polar molecules

Postby Michelle Nwufo 2G » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:30 pm

Can someone explain to me why NF3 is a polar molecule? Is it because the lone pair on the central atom distorts the shape of what would have been a tetrahedral, making the molecule asymmetrical?
Last edited by Michelle Nwufo 2G on Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Kyleigh Follis 2H
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Polar molecules

Postby Kyleigh Follis 2H » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:33 pm

Not sure if you mean NF3, but if so it is because the dipoles do not cancel each other due to the lone pair giving the shape of trigonal pyramidal. So, the N-F polar bonds make the whole molecule polar.

Mona Lee 4L
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Polar molecules

Postby Mona Lee 4L » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:35 pm

If there is a lone pair, there will likely be a net dipole pointing in the opposite direction. In general, if a molecule has lone pairs, it is likely to be polar.

Louise Zhuang
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Polar molecules

Postby Louise Zhuang » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:36 pm

Your explanation is basically right. The lone pair also has a strong negative charge, and there's nothing at the opposite side to cancel it out, making the molecule polar.

Dina Geotas 4A
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Polar molecules

Postby Dina Geotas 4A » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:36 pm

NF4 would be polar due to the lone pair of electrons around the central atom, N.

KatrinaPho_2I
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Polar molecules

Postby KatrinaPho_2I » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:37 pm

Yes, your explanation is perfect for why this molecule is polar :)


Return to “Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests