polarity

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Dakota_Campbell_1C
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polarity

Postby Dakota_Campbell_1C » Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:46 pm

Is it safe to assume that any covalently bonded molecule with a lone pair on the central atom will be polar? How can polarity be determined with larger molecules in class Lavelle usually draws arrows to demonstrate what direction the positive and negative poles are at how is this determined.

Henry Krasner 1C
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Re: polarity

Postby Henry Krasner 1C » Thu Nov 29, 2018 9:31 pm

Molecules that are completely symmetrical are nonpolar, whereas molecules that are uneven (as in when drawn out in a Lewis Structure) are polar.

Carlos De La Torre 2L
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Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2018 12:16 am

Re: polarity

Postby Carlos De La Torre 2L » Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:29 pm

yes going off of the previous post, molecules that are symmetric are non-polar, for example, a square planar molecule is non-polar despite having two lone pairs due to it being symmetric, usually larger molecules with different elements that isn't symmetrical are non-polar. To help determine if it is polar or not find the central atom and see if the dipoles are the same on both sides .

Xingzheng Sun 2K
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: polarity

Postby Xingzheng Sun 2K » Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:29 pm

Molecules with one pair of electrons are polar, but as for two pairs or more, it depends on the shape and if the elements are the same. The graph on the textbook of VSEPR type VS polarity would help.

Ivan Tadeja 4B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: polarity

Postby Ivan Tadeja 4B » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:08 pm

With that logic, it would make sense that due to the presence of a lone pair then the shape would not be symmetrical, therefore electrons would not be evenly shared. However I would say drawing out the structure just to demonstrate and prove its polarity. I'm not sure that your reasoning would suffice during a test.

Dana Wilks 3I
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Re: polarity

Postby Dana Wilks 3I » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:46 pm

405211415 wrote: To help determine if it is polar or not find the central atom and see if the dipoles are the same on both sides .


Going off of this, to determine if the dipoles are the same or not, you can look at the electronegativity of the (different) atoms surrounding the central atom.

Megan Gianna Uy 3L
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: polarity

Postby Megan Gianna Uy 3L » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:00 pm

A molecule that is a dipole (meaning positively charged on one side and negatively charged on the other) is polar. A molecule that is nonpolar is, as previously stated, symmetrical.

Yiting_Gong_4L
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: polarity

Postby Yiting_Gong_4L » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:50 pm

It is better to check the symmetry of the lewis structure.

amogha_koka3I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: polarity

Postby amogha_koka3I » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:36 pm

So just to confirm, does polarity have anything to do with if there are single, double, or triple bonds?

Ricardo Martin 1J
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Re: polarity

Postby Ricardo Martin 1J » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:40 am

If a Lewis structure is symmetric it is non-polar and if it is not symmetric it is polar.

Jchellis 1I
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Re: polarity

Postby Jchellis 1I » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:06 pm

To check the symmetry of a Lewis Structure you can draw a line down the middle for a simple test

305115396
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: polarity

Postby 305115396 » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:32 pm

amogha_koka3I wrote:So just to confirm, does polarity have anything to do with if there are single, double, or triple bonds?


Just as VSEPR structures daren't drawn according to whether they have single, double, or triple bonds, polarity is also not determined in this way. Polarity doesn't have to do with single, double, or triple bonds.


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