Seesaw and t shape angles

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Nawaphan Watanasirisuk 3B
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Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:03 am

Seesaw and t shape angles

Postby Nawaphan Watanasirisuk 3B » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:51 pm

For seesaw, the bonds in the axial plane are <90 degrees right? How about the bonds in the equatorial planes, are those 120 degrees apart or <120 ?

For T-shape, are 2 bonds in the axial plane are <90 degree? Would they be even less than the axial plane bonds in seesaw since there are 2 lone pairs pushing them whereas seesaw has 1 pair?
'

Jessica Castro 2H
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Seesaw and t shape angles

Postby Jessica Castro 2H » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:00 pm

For a molecule whose shape is seesaw, it's arrangement of electrons is trigonal bypyramidal. In a trigonal bipyramidal shape, we have angles 90, 120, and 180 degrees. When we make one of the bonds on the equatorial in a trigonal bypyramidal shape a lone pair, all the angles are less than the original angles. Therefore, the angles of a seesaw shape are <90, <120, and <180.

For a molecule whose shape is T-shap, it's arrangement of electrons is also trigonal bypyramindal, but instead we replace to bonds on the equatorial with lone pairs. The 90 degrees and 180 degree angles formed by the two axial and one equatorial bond are conserved. Therefore, the bond angles for T-shape are 90 degrees and 180 degrees.

Ashish Verma 2I
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Seesaw and t shape angles

Postby Ashish Verma 2I » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:05 pm

Less than 120, also in the case of T-Shape versus seesaw both sets of bonds you've referred to are less than 90 degrees but indicating which is specifically lower is not usually important as long as you state that they are each lower than 90.


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