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Sulfur bonding

Posted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 10:35 am
by William Chan 1D
In lecture today, Lavelle showed that sulfur can have 6 bonds (2 double bonds, 2 single bonds). Wouldn’t that be more than a full shell (of 8 e-)? Why is this allowed?

Re: Sulfur bonding

Posted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 10:57 am
by Goyama_2A
Although most elements need exactly 8 electrons in a bond to be stable, there are some exceptions to the rule. Some elements, like Boron, can be stable with less than 8 electrons, while some other elements, like Sulfur, can be stable with more than 8 electrons. This is due to the expansion of valence that occurs which allows certain elements, like sulfur, to utilize their empty d-orbitals to hold more electrons. In this case, sulfur is using its empty 3D orbital to allow itself to fit up to 12 electrons rather than only 8.

Re: Sulfur bonding

Posted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:01 am
by Jaci Glassick 2G
I just got out of lecture. Lavelle said that certain atoms can break the octane rule. P, Cl, and S can accommodate more than 8 valence electrons. Atoms in period 3 or higher have higher d-orbitals (I'm literally coping my notes so if this is really brief that is why).

Re: Sulfur bonding

Posted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:24 am
by Alexa Mugol 3I
To add on to the other replies, P, Cl, and S can bond up to 6 times because they can utilize their empty 3d orbitals. 2p elements aren't able to do this because there aren't any 2d orbitals. I'm pretty sure that other elements with empty d orbitals can also bond more than 4 times.

Re: Sulfur bonding

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:52 pm
by Ruth Glauber 1C
I think that this is called an expanded octet.

Re: Sulfur bonding

Posted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:56 am
by Areena H 2K
Everything third row and beyond can have expanded octets because they have d shells that are available for them to use, therefore they can all have expanded octets.