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VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:15 pm
by JinwooLee_1F
I was looking up the VESPR model of H2O and it wasn't linear, which I expected it to be. Are there new models we are going to learn?

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:17 pm
by xenamclean_1G
I think we will learn more about its shape in particular (bent) on Friday or next week.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:19 pm
by EmilyJoo_1G
I was wondering the same thing. There are several other VSEPR shapes in the textbook he hasn't gone over, so he probably will in the next few lectures or so.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:25 pm
by Abby Soriano 1J
The presence of the two lone pairs on the oxygen makes it so that water has a bent (or angular) shape rather than linear. Lone pairs generally take up more space than bonded pairs do (since the electrons exist in a probability cloud rather than being confined in a bond) and so the repulsion of the lone pairs makes the molecule take on a bent shape. Dr. Lavelle will most likely go over this in more accurate detail on Friday.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:52 pm
by Edmund Zhi 2B
We haven't gone over molecules with lone pairs yet. But in H2O, there are 4 regions of electrons. The two lone pairs repel the bonding pairs and the shape is actually bent.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:06 pm
by annikaying
H2O is bent. I'm assuming we will cover molecular shapes with lone pairs sometime in the next week.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:00 pm
by Esha Chawla 2E
JinwooLee_1F wrote:I was looking up the VESPR model of H2O and it wasn't linear, which I expected it to be. Are there new models we are going to learn?


Kind of - right now we have only considered the VSEPR model by looking at atoms. However, we also need to consider lone pairs when determining the molecular geometry of a given molecules, such as H2O. In lecture so far we have only considered shape based on atoms. Once we learn how lone pairs affect molecular shape, we will be able to understand why H2O is not linear, but rather bent.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:54 pm
by Nare Nazaryan 1F
H2O would be bent, with oxygen in the center and one hydrogen on the lower left of oxygen and the other on the lower right. This is due to the polarity of water, with the hydrogen atoms having partial positive charge and the dipole arrows being directed toward the oxygen (partial negative charge). Otherwise, if it was linear, the dipole arrows would cancel each other (both pointing from hydrogen to oxygen) and water would be nonpolar, which is definitely not the case.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 9:56 pm
by Micah3J
I was wondering about the example of the VSEPR Model of CO3 that we went over in lecture today. Does the double bond cause it to have any polarity?

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 10:57 pm
by Julieta Serobyan4D
Micah3J wrote:I was wondering about the example of the VSEPR Model of CO3 that we went over in lecture today. Does the double bond cause it to have any polarity?

Yes!! C has partially positive charge and O has partially negative charge.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 3:33 pm
by ABombino_2J
H20 has a bent shape because it has 2 lone pairs and 2 single bonds. When trying to determine shape, count all the bonding regions and lone pairs. I assume we will learn about this in class on Friday.

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 4:31 pm
by 705198479
H20 is bent

Re: VESPR Model of H2O

Posted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:47 pm
by Michelle Xie 2B
H2O is bent because of the two lone pairs on the oxygen.