London dispersion forces and vander waals

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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lasarro
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby lasarro » Fri Nov 15, 2019 8:28 pm

Could someone please give me an example to explain london dispersion forces and vanderwaals.

MingdaH 3B
Posts: 133
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby MingdaH 3B » Fri Nov 15, 2019 8:57 pm

van der waals forces is a general term that includes all intermolecular forces. London dispersion forces is a type of van der waals force that occurs between nonpolar molecules with instantaneously occuring dipoles.

Rohan Kubba Dis 4B
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby Rohan Kubba Dis 4B » Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:04 pm

An example of a van der waal force would be that of a sample of Helium. Essentially, it has a full valence shell and it would have a momentary dipole (one side of atom is positive and the other side is negative), therefore another helium atom could interact with its positive portion to the negative portion of the first helium atom. Basically, most substances can utilize van der Waal interactions and it is the weakest intermolecular reaction.

Ashley R 1A
Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby Ashley R 1A » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:35 am

London Dispersion Force (LDF) is a weak intermolecular force caused by the distribution of elections in the electron cloud of atoms. Hence, because all atoms have electron clouds including noble gases, noble gases can have LDF with other atoms. Moreover, whether molecules are polar or non polar, LDF exist due to the distortion of each atom's electron cloud.

805422680
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby 805422680 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 2:20 am

An example for a Van der Waals interaction would be between N2 molecules. They do not have an inherent dipole moment beween the two atoms as they are identical, however, there is an instantaneous dipole created due to a shift in the electron density distribution, which thereby induces a dipole moment between neighboring molecules. London dispersion forces are just a type of Van der Waals interaction.

Ruth Glauber 1C
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: London dispersion forces and vander waals

Postby Ruth Glauber 1C » Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:35 am

I think that London Dispersion Forces are a specific type of vander waals.


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