Bent or Angular

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Aedra Li 3H
Posts: 40
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Bent or Angular

Postby Aedra Li 3H » Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:27 pm

Does it matter whether we label a molecule as either bent or angular, as they are the same thing?

Osvaldo SanchezF -1H
Posts: 122
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Osvaldo SanchezF -1H » Fri Nov 15, 2019 10:00 pm

Geometrically it would be referred as angular and the book mentions it this way. So as to not take any chances or confuse the grader I would stick with labeling it as angular. Also saying something is bent is very broad as you can say a shape of Trigonal Pyramidal is bent too.

Nathan Nakaguchi 1G
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Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Nathan Nakaguchi 1G » Fri Nov 15, 2019 10:04 pm

Personally I refer to it as angular for the same reasons as the post before me. I think either is acceptable, but double check with your TA to be sure.

cassidysong 1K
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby cassidysong 1K » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:16 pm

I don't believe it matters as it was referred to as angular in the textbook and Lavelle referred to the shape as bent.

DesireBrown1J
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby DesireBrown1J » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:30 pm

So, the bond angle in H2O is 104.5 degrees (from the textbook). On test 2, should we state that the bond angle for all angular molecules is 104.5 degrees or should we just say less than 120 degrees?

Aarushi Solanki 4F
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Aarushi Solanki 4F » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:33 pm

"Bent" and "angular" are the same shape, but I believe "angular" is the preferred term for this class since the solutions manual refers to the shape as "angular."

Sally Qiu 2E
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Sally Qiu 2E » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:35 pm

i don't believe there's a difference? the textbook may say angular but lavelle referred to it as "bent"

HuyHa_2H
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby HuyHa_2H » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:41 pm

Bent and angular are the same thing, but I'd probably use angular just because it's how the book calls it.

Anvi Brahmbhatt 4A
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Anvi Brahmbhatt 4A » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:44 pm

"Bent" and "angular" refer to the same shape, but I would use "angular" as that is what the book refers to it as.

Jingyao Chen 4H
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Jingyao Chen 4H » Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:58 pm

They should be the same thing. I recommend that one the test, the safest way is to use the name that Dr. Lavelle uses in lecture slides.

505316964
Posts: 95
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby 505316964 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 6:03 pm

DesireBrown3K wrote:So, the bond angle in H2O is 104.5 degrees (from the textbook). On test 2, should we state that the bond angle for all angular molecules is 104.5 degrees or should we just say less than 120 degrees?



To answer the question above,

You would say it is less than 109.5 degrees

109.5 degrees is the predicted degrees for compounds with a tetrahedral arrangement: 4 regions of electron density. H20 has four regions of electron density: 2 bond pairs, 2 lone pairs. Since H20 is bent, the lone pair makes the angle smaller.

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sat Nov 16, 2019 6:19 pm

DesireBrown3K wrote:So, the bond angle in H2O is 104.5 degrees (from the textbook). On test 2, should we state that the bond angle for all angular molecules is 104.5 degrees or should we just say less than 120 degrees?


Angular molecules can have varying bond angles depending on the amount of lone pairs there are such as SO2 has only one lone pair, so the bond angle is 120 degrees. H20 has two lone pairs so the bond angle is 104.5 degrees, I believe if there are two lone pairs in another angular molecule then in that case it would have the same bond angle of 104.5 degrees.

Merin Padayatty 3G
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Bent or Angular

Postby Merin Padayatty 3G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:35 am

Bent and angular are synonymous, but the textbook uses the term "angular."

KHowe_1D
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Re: Bent or Angular

Postby KHowe_1D » Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:50 am

I would refer to the bond as angular because it is the more formal way of referring to the bond.

Either should be fine but to be safe, I would refer to it as angular as stated in the textbook.


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