Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Darren Nguyen 1F
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:15 am

Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

Postby Darren Nguyen 1F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:17 pm

Like what if there was a lone pair above a below the central atom, could the molecular shape stay linear that way?

Abigail_Hagen2G
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

Postby Abigail_Hagen2G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:24 pm

I think it depends on the atoms attached

Lauren Bui 1E
Posts: 54
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

Postby Lauren Bui 1E » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:24 pm

I believe this would make the shape bent. For example, both H20 and SO2 have lone pairs on the central atom; thus, the shape is bent.

Sydney Pell 2E
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

Postby Sydney Pell 2E » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:24 pm

If two lone pairs were added to the central atom, the molecule would then have four areas of electron density and so the electron geometry would be tetrahedral and the molecular geometry would then be bent since there are 2 bonding pairs. So, a molecule can only be linear if the central atom only has two areas of electron density.

Abigail_Hagen2G
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

Postby Abigail_Hagen2G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:27 pm

If you just had two atoms attached with two lone pairs, it would end up being bent, as the lone pairs wouldn't be able to just be opposite of each other. It would end up looking like a water molecule.


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