linear versus angular

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Sarah Blake-2I
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

linear versus angular

Postby Sarah Blake-2I » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:25 pm

How would you distinguish whether a molecule is linear or bent? Does it have to do with lone pairs or polarizability or something else? I am just a little confused on how you figure out the shape.

Jamie Lee 1H
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: linear versus angular

Postby Jamie Lee 1H » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:30 pm

To figure out the geometry of the molecule, you have to determine how many lone pairs are existing (if there is any) to help you identify what type of geometry the molecule has.

Rhea Shah 2F
Posts: 80
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: linear versus angular

Postby Rhea Shah 2F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:04 pm

When describing molecular geometry, lone pairs and bonds are included in the description. When describing shape of a molecule, only bonds are taken into account. Thus, lone pairs and bonds within the molecule are responsible for determining whether a molecule is linear or bent.

Kaylee Clarke 1G
Posts: 85
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: linear versus angular

Postby Kaylee Clarke 1G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:11 pm

A compound seems to be bent when there is a lone pair on the central atom because the lone pair repulse the bonding pairs and sightly displace them.

Max Madrzyk Dis 4G
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: linear versus angular

Postby Max Madrzyk Dis 4G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:26 pm

Yes, it has to do with lone pairs and polarity, so if these charges are present they will repel other elements and cause the bent shape that is observed in water rather than the linear shape present in co2 when there are 2 lone pairs that repel the other elements equally.

Sydney Myers 4I
Posts: 85
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: linear versus angular

Postby Sydney Myers 4I » Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:32 pm

Max Madrzyk Dis 4E wrote:Yes, it has to do with lone pairs and polarity, so if these charges are present they will repel other elements and cause the bent shape that is observed in water rather than the linear shape present in co2 when there are 2 lone pairs that repel the other elements equally.


I'm not quite sure that the charges from polarity has anything to do with it. A molecule can be polar as a result of its shape (because its dipole moments don't cancel) but whether a molecule is polar or not doesn't influence the shape.


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