Lone pairs and bond angles

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Shanzey
Posts: 120
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Lone pairs and bond angles

Postby Shanzey » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:48 pm

Does having a lone pair on the central atom decrease the bond angles of the other attached atoms?

rabiasumar2E
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Lone pairs and bond angles

Postby rabiasumar2E » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:51 pm

Yes, a lone pair decreases the bond angles. For example, in NH3 since there is a lone pair the bond angles will be around 107 degrees rather than the 109.5 degrees that shape usually gives.

Ashley Tran 2I
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Lone pairs and bond angles

Postby Ashley Tran 2I » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:53 pm

Yes, the repulsion of a lone pair pushes the atoms bonded to the central atom closer together. This is because the electron cloud of a lone pair can spread over a larger volume than a bonding pair can, because a bonding pair (or several bonding pairs in a multiple bond) is held in place by two atoms, not one.

Katheryne N 3G
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:22 am

Re: Lone pairs and bond angles

Postby Katheryne N 3G » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:57 pm

A lone pair on the central atom would push bonding electron pairs closer together, therefore decreasing the bond angles, since it has a stronger/higher repulsion (l.p-l.p > l.p-b.p > b.p-b.p).

Ayushi2011
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Lone pairs and bond angles

Postby Ayushi2011 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 4:23 pm

Lone pair decreases bond angle because it causes repulsion with other lone pairs and bonding pairs.


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