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single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:49 pm
by Karina Kong 2H
Why are single, double, and triple bonds treated as equivalent regions of electron density?

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:54 pm
by AveryAgosto
In regards to VSEPR I think that multiple bonds have higher electron density than a single bond, because the electrons take up more space.

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:55 pm
by Kaylee Sepulveda 4G
The double and triple bonds are also treated as one region of electron density because, although they have more electrons that a lone pair or single bond, the electrons lie in the same region (between the two bonded atoms) and they are oriented in the same direction. This means that it is technically one region with either four or six electrons (depending on the type of bond).

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:01 pm
by TheresaDsilva4A
Multiple bonds are treated as single regions of high electron density because these bonds always act as a single unit. Thus, any resonance structure of a particular molecule will have the same shape as determined by the VSEPR model. Hope this helps!

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:02 pm
by gabbymaraziti
Regardless of how many electrons are held within the bond, they all act as a single unit because they all lie in the same region.

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:35 pm
by BryantChung_4B
Whether the bond is single, double, or triple, it is still grouped as one area of electron density, so it can be treated the same as a different type of bond.

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:40 pm
by ZevMarx-Kahn3C
Will double and triple bonds repel any more than the single bonds (enough to change the angles at all)?