electronegativity

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Abigail Menchaca_1H
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

electronegativity

Postby Abigail Menchaca_1H » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:48 pm

How can you determine high electronegativity in a molecule?

JustinHorriat_4f
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby JustinHorriat_4f » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:50 pm

there is a pattern in the periodic table, as you go up and right, the electronegativity of the atoms rise. But basically, its the how much an atom attracts electrons. And this electronegativity is determined by looking at its atomic number (nuclear charge) and the amount of valence electrons.

JustinHorriat_4f
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby JustinHorriat_4f » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:52 pm

It goes along the same guidelines as ionization energy. smaller molecule, with a greater nuclear charge, will attracts its electrons more.

Mariepahos4D
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby Mariepahos4D » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:54 pm

The electronegativity of the molecule is determined by the difference in electronegativity values of the atoms involved. If the difference in electronegativity is great enough (greater than 2), the bond between elements is considered ionic. If the difference is less than 1.5 the molecule is considered to be covalently bonded. However, there are differing levels of ionic character of a bond depending on the difference of electronegativity values of the elements. A polar molecule is one that does not have a great enough difference in electronegativity values to be an ionic compound, but contains bonds between different elements placed in a way that the overall character of the molecule is polar (the bonds between these elements in the molecule would be polar covalent).

Marty Hockey
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby Marty Hockey » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:55 pm

Electronegativity for a molecule is determined by the difference between the electronegativity of the different atoms. For example, H has an electronegativity of 2.1 and F has an electronegativity of 4.0, so 4.0 - 2.1 = 1.9. HF, therefore, has an electronegativity of 1.9.

gferg21
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby gferg21 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:55 pm

the more electrons in the valence, the smaller the electron, the greater nuclear charge. That means that the atom has a higher electronegativity and will likely attract more electrons to it (or be more likely to accept and electron).

VioletKo3F
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:18 am

Re: electronegativity

Postby VioletKo3F » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:58 pm

Look up the electronegativity on the table and subtract the smaller electronegativity from the larger one.


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