Exact Bond Angles for Test 1

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Ryan 1K
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Exact Bond Angles for Test 1

Postby Ryan 1K » Mon Nov 18, 2019 10:03 pm

Do we need to know the exact bond angles for molecular shapes that have lone electron pairs or can we just say slightly less than 109.5 degrees for AX3E and AX2E2 (NH3 and H2O)?

AlyssaYeh_1B
Posts: 81
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Exact Bond Angles for Test 1

Postby AlyssaYeh_1B » Mon Nov 18, 2019 10:08 pm

We don't need to know the exact bond angles for those shapes! Just approximating it by saying it's less than 109.5 degrees, or less than 120 degrees is enough :)

Esha Chawla 2E
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Exact Bond Angles for Test 1

Postby Esha Chawla 2E » Mon Nov 18, 2019 10:32 pm

Ryan Chew 1C wrote:Do we need to know the exact bond angles for molecular shapes that have lone electron pairs or can we just say slightly less than 109.5 degrees for AX3E and AX2E2 (NH3 and H2O)?


Professor Lavelle actually talked about this in lecture. It's practically impossible for us to know what the angle is unless you perform an experiment. Thus, it's just sufficient to say that the angle is less than a given angle (i.e. less than 120 degrees).

Abby Soriano 1J
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Exact Bond Angles for Test 1

Postby Abby Soriano 1J » Mon Nov 18, 2019 10:54 pm

You can make approximations (slightly less than __) but the only important thing is to know the concept behind why that is. The lone pairs have a greater repulsion that makes the bond angles slightly smaller than they should ideally be.


Return to “Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests