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Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:53 am
by Katherine Chhen 3I
How would I be able to distinguish between a shape that is bent or linear since they both have 2 bonded atoms?

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:00 pm
by jvera4b
A bent molecule will have a lone pair, or two in the case of AX2E2, on the central atom as opposed to a linear which has no lone pairs around the central atom.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:04 pm
by Katherine Chhen 3I
What about AX2E3 since it is linear and not bent?

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:25 pm
by Aedra Li 3H
AX3E2 would be t shaped

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:47 pm
by William Francis 2E
When a central atom is bonded to two atoms with no lone pairs, it is linear. If one lone pair is present on the central atom, the molecule is bent since the lone pair repels the bonded atoms. I find it useful to count how many areas of electron density there are for the central atom before I determine the shape. For instance, if a central atom is bonded to two atoms and has one lone pair, there are three areas of electron density. If all three areas of electron density were bonded atoms, the atom would have a trigonal planar shape with 120 degree bond angles; however, since one of the areas of electron density is a lone pair, the bond angle must be less than 120 degrees as lone pairs repel bonded atoms more than bonded atoms repel each other. Therefore, the molecule must be bent. If the central atom has two lone pairs and two bonds, it has four regions of electron density. This is like a water molecule. It is also bent.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:38 pm
by Jenna Ortiguerra 4G
A linear molecule has an angle of 180 degrees because it is just a straight line between the three atoms. Bent molecules typically have a lone pair, causing repulsion between the bonded atoms, ultimately forming a smaller angle between the bonded atoms. AX2 and AX2E3 are both linear molecules, with AX2E3 being linear because the 3 lone pairs are on the equatorial plane, allowing the axial plane to stay (180 degrees).

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 3:07 pm
by Megan Ngai- 3B
Bent has a lone pair while linear does not.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 10:35 am
by Katherine Chhen 3I
AX2E3 has 3 lone pairs however it is still considered linear on the handout that we were given in discussion.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:06 am
by Bradley Whitworth 4B
It depends on lone pairs on the central atom so draw the lewis structure and work from there.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:20 am
by Leyna Dang 2H
You could draw the Lewis structure and determine the VSEPR formula. A formula of AX2E or AX2E2 would indicate that the molecule is bent. AX2 or AX2E3 would be linear.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:50 am
by Hannah Pham
The bent shape has lone pair on the central atom while the linear shape typically does not have any lone pairs except for the exception of the molecule with 5 electron densities where there are 2 bonds and 3 lone pairs and the molecule with 6 electron densities with 2 bonds and 4 electron densities.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:45 am
by erica thompson 4I
It's helpful to think about how many electron pairs are occupying spots where there may/may not be atoms. Add the Xs and Es together to get the electron configuration, and then subtract as many atoms as there are lone pairs. This way you'll see which molecules should be "bent" down or not.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:47 am
by AmyL_3L
The bent shape has 1-2 lone pairs on the central atom, whereas the linear shape has none or 3-4 lone pairs.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:01 pm
by 805373590
the bent shape has 1-2 lone pairs whereas linear has 0 0r 3 in the case of I3.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:04 pm
by EvaLi_3J
A molecule would be bent because it has lone pairs on the central atom. Lone pairs have very strong electronic repulsion, for which the other two atoms bonded to the central atom are repelled to be as far from the lone pair as possible.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:03 pm
by zfinn
bent will have 1 or 2 lone pairs (AX2E oe AX2E2) while linear will have none or 3 (AX2 or AX2E3)!

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:06 pm
by Frederick Keith_4C
If there were only two bonded atoms and no lone pairs of electrons, then the electron arrangement would be LINEAR. But if there were two bonded atoms AND lone pairs of electrons, then the electron arrangement would be BENT or ANGULAR.
This is because the repulsive nature of the lone pair electron is greater than that of the bonded atom because it can occupy more space.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:37 pm
by emma brinton_3B
a bent molecule is AX2E and AX2E2 while linear is AX2, AX2E4, and AX2E3

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:22 pm
by Martina
A bent molecule has a lone pair which pushes the other atoms away from it, causing a bent shape.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 6:05 pm
by Tahlia Mullins
A bent molecule will have one or two lone pairs with VESPR functions AX2E and AX2E2

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 6:14 pm
by Megan Jung 3A
you can look at the VSEPR formula. For bent molecules, the formula can be: AX2E or AX2E2. for linear molecules the formula can be: AX2 or AX2E3 or AX2E4

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 6:44 pm
by preyasikumar_2L
Linear will have ONLY those two bonded atoms around the central atom, or the two bonded atoms and enough lone pairs around the central atom that would cause the dipole moments created from the lone pairs to cancel out, while bent would have the two bonded atoms around the central atom AND lone pairs with dipole moments that won't cancel out.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:11 pm
by Catherine Daye 1L
A bent molecule has one or two lone pairs, while a linear molecule has three lone pairs or none.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:12 pm
by SimranSangha4I
linear wouldn't contain a lone pair while bent would.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:39 pm
by SarahCoufal_1k
Bent has 1 or 2 lone pairs- either AX2E or AX2E2. They are bent because the lone pairs repel the electrons on the bonded atoms.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:50 pm
by AniP_2D
A linear shaped molecule has no lone pairs at the central atom, while a bent shaped molecule does have one or two lone pairs at the central atom.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:54 pm
by Jarrett Peyrefitte 2K
Bent molecules have a lone pair, aka "E", compared to linear molecules do not. The lone pairs repel the electrons on the bonded atoms.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:41 pm
by Sreyes_1C
linear will have no lone pairs so the bond angle will not be altered

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:51 pm
by Rosa Munoz 2E
2 bonded pairs, 1 lone pair= bent. 2 bonded pairs, 2 lone pairs=bent.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:34 pm
by 305376058
The bent molecule contains lone pairs, linear does not.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:38 pm
by Megan Ngai- 3B
bent has a lone pair while linear does not

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:46 pm
by Matthew Tsai 2H
If there are either one or two electron pairs on the central atom along with the two bonded atoms, it would result in bent shape. Otherwise, the molecule would be linear in shape.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:55 pm
by kendal mccarthy
Look to see the electron geometries and molecular shapes to help you decide! For example if there are 2 atoms bonded and 1 electron then it is bent, if there are 2 atoms and 2 electrons it is also bent, if there are 2 atoms and 3 electrons it is linear because the lone pairs balance eachother out.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:17 am
by Caitlin Ciardelli 3E
The biggest difference between linear and bent is to notice whether something is pushing down on the outside two atoms (such as a lone pair on the central atom). Hope this helps :)

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:06 am
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Bent has lone pairs while linear does not.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 9:42 am
by Natalie Benitez 1E
Can we refer to bent as angular or v-shaped as well or are we limited to just saying bent for exams?

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 9:44 am
by Paul Hage 2G
Natalie Benitez 1C wrote:Can we refer to bent as angular or v-shaped as well or are we limited to just saying bent for exams?

I recall hearing that bent or v-shaped would be accepted for exams. However, all three are the same shape. I would refer to it as bent on exams to be on the safe side.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:09 am
by ZainAlrawi_1J
Bent molecules have a lone pair.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:35 pm
by Natalie Benitez 1E
While both molecular geometry's do have two bonds connected to the central the main thing to consider is if there are any lone pairs on the central atom as well. There are two instances when it can be considered linear; one way is when there are only two bonds to the central atom and no lone pairs, the other is when the orbital geometry is that of a trigonal bi-pyramidal in which there are 3 lone pairs and 2 bonds attached to the central atom. Bent molecular geometry occurs when there are 2 bonds and one lone pair and also when there 2 bonds and 2 lone pairs.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:53 pm
by Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K
If a molecule has two lone pairs, whether or not it is bent or linear depends on the total number of regions of electron density.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:07 pm
by AngieGarcia_4F
Linear has no lone electrons so it would be AX but a bent shape has a lone pair so it would be AXE.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:59 pm
by Maya Beal Dis 1D
Does bent mean the same thing as angular? In the textbook they use the term angular and I was sure what that meant.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 6:14 pm
by Kylie Lim 4G
A bent molecule will have a lone pair that forces the other two bonded atoms into a bent bond angle, and the linear molecules either have no lone pairs, or the lone pairs are evenly distributed so that the molecule is still linear (in molecules with 5 or 6 electron density regions)

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:29 pm
by Caitlin Ciardelli 3E
A bent molecule must have at least one lone pair on the central atom. A molecule will be linear without the lone pair because there is nothing pushing down on them. When you add the lone pair, the other two atoms want to be as far away (repulsion) causing the molecule to be bent

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:52 pm
by Snigdha Uppu 1G
A molecule is bent rather than linear because when a lone pair has more repulsion than that of another atom, so even though the other two atoms in the bent shape are closer together, this is still a more optimal shape.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:54 pm
by Jarrett Peyrefitte 2K
A linear molecule has a 180 degree angle while a bent has less than a 120 degree angle

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:57 pm
by Shail Avasthi 2C
Bent molecules will have lone pairs on the central atom in addition to the two bound atoms. These lone pairs will distort the shape of the molecule to bent instead of linear.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:27 pm
by ramiro_romero
Liner shapes will have 2 bonding atoms and 1 or 2 lone pairs on the central atoms. Linear shapes are also 2 bonding atoms but will have either zero or 3 lone pairs on the central atom. AX2E, AX2E2 = bent. AX2, AX2E3= linear. Also, bent shapes are more likely to be polar than linear shapes

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:04 pm
by Sears 4A
linear: 2 regions of electron density, 2 bonds
bent: 4 regions of electron density, 2 bonds

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:39 pm
by AronCainBayot2K
A molecule would be linear if there is one central atom and no lone pairs on the central atom where as the molecule would be bent if there is a lone pair. The only exception is AX2E3 where it is also linear.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:42 pm
by Micah3J
Is there a difference between bent and angular? Or is it just another way of saying the same thing?

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:24 pm
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Bent molecules can have the VSEPR formula AX2E or AX2E2. Linear molecules can have the VSEPR formula AX2, AX2E, or AX2E3. It depends on the number of lone pairs and how the regions of electron density affect the shape of the molecule.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:25 pm
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Micah3J wrote:Is there a difference between bent and angular? Or is it just another way of saying the same thing?


These are interchangeable terms for the same shape! They both describe the molecular shape that has a bond angle of <120 degrees.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:48 am
by Kylie Lim 4G
Linear comes from the parent electron geometries of trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral, whereas bent comes from trigonal planar and tetrahedral

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:54 am
by 005384106
Katherine Chhen 3I wrote:What about AX2E3 since it is linear and not bent?


You cannot have all 3 electrons together because there would be a lot of electron electron repulsion, therefore 2 electrons and one electron would repel from the 2 atoms and allow for this linear shape

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:55 pm
by Maika Ngoie 1B
Looking at the number of lone pairs can help identify whether or not the molecule is bent or linear.

Re: Bent vs linear

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:57 pm
by Kavya Immadisetty 2B
If there are lone pairs, the molecule is probably bent